Technics EAH-F70N Review

Technics EAH-F70N Review

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Technics may be best known for its turntables, but it also has a reasonably wide range of quality headphones. One of them being the EAH-F70N. These high-quality, over-ear wireless headphones feature Active Noise Canceling (ANC) technology and advanced features. The headphones are well-equipped with three-level active noise canceling and comes with everything you can expect from high-quality Bluetooth headphones: Bluetooth 4.2, including Qualcomm aptX HD, LDAC, sufficient autonomy, and a frequency response of 4 Hz - 40 kHz.

Technics EAH-F70N ANC Headphones Review

1. Overview - not finished

Type: Over-ear Noise Cancelling Headphones | Bluetooth: 4.0 | Battery: 30 Hours | Charging: 4 Hours | Drivers: Dynamic | Drivers-Size: 45 mm | Weight: 385g

Pros

Cons

To be completed

Beyerdynamic Aventho Wireless On-Ear Headphones
Technics EAH-F70N - Package Accessories Bundle | Source: Technics
5/5
5/5

The Technics EAH-F70N costs a bit under $300 and isn’t available in any particularly fancy colors (you have a choice between black, white, and brown), but the small details here are awe-inspiring,

The delivery scope includes a transport bag, a 1.2-meter audio cable for wired operation, an airplane adapter, and a USB charging cable.

The earcups fold down to fit in the carrying case, and when folded, they become relatively compact. A complaint though, when worn around the neck, the ear cups rotate inward rather than outward. The feeling of wearing the Technics F70N like this is unfamiliar and uncomfortable.

5/5
5/5

Technics F70N displays subtle, elegant curves that are not accompanied by any sharp edge or corner. The ear cups are made of plastic and an aluminum cover in which the manufacturer engraves his lettering by laser. The headphones’ direction shows nothing flashy. From an acoustic perspective and design, F70N clearly tries to appeal to the middle generation who would like to enjoy sophisticated music on the go.

The Japanese handset has powerful 40-millimeter drivers, a wireless connection via Bluetooth, and active noise-canceling on board. All functions can be accessed through three physical control keys on the right earcup; therefore, Technics F70N doesn’t feature any touch panels.

With the mechanical buttons, you can: pause/resume playback, adjust the volume. You can also activate the smartphone’s voice assistant using the EAH-F70N, and there is also a sensor onboard that analyzes whether you are wearing the Technics on your head or have put it down. The 3-level noise-canceling can be set by pressing the “NC” button multiple times.

The overall appearance of the headphones is subtle. Quality can be noticed as you pick them up; from the all-aluminum construction to the leather-trimmed earpads and headband, they certainly don’t feel cheap or fragile. They weigh only 292 grams and this, combined with the pleasant cushioning of both the headband and earbuds, makes them one of the most comfortable wireless headphones on the market. To some, the shape of the ear cups may seem a little snug, but their passive noise canceling ability is incredible as a result.

For a pair of noise-canceling wireless headphones, Technics F70N made of plastic are relatively light and comfortable. They fit comfortably on the head, although I’m not confident they can be worn all day or as long as Bose QC 35 II.

4/5
4/5

The headphones are still equipped with Bluetooth 4.2 and not yet with Bluetooth 5.0. When it comes to Bluetooth connectivity, the F70N supports all major codecs: SBC, AAC, Qualcomm aptX, aptX HD, and Sony’s high-quality LDAC.

With a battery life of 20 hours (ANC on), the headphones are quite enduring for a mid-range model. The quick-charge function helps provide the owner with 2 hours of playtime after 15 minutes of charging. However, the performance is not ground-breaking. You’ll be required to wait around four hours to fully charge from an empty battery.

The Technics EAH-F70N headphones are designed to operate mainly wirelessly as it’s via Bluetooth when they perform the best. Nevertheless, when the battery is drained, you can use the 1.2m cable to connect them to your smartphone via the 3.5mm jack.

Two devices can be connected via Bluetooth at the same time so that you can enjoy a film on the computer and not miss a call on your smartphone. Similarly to Sony’s “Ambient Sound,” EAH-F70N has a Surround Amplifier function operates by placing your hand on your right earcup. The headphones temporarily amplify ambient noise to listen around you without removing your headphones.

4/5
4/5

The new hybrid active noise canceling works well, the setting options are practical, and the hear-through function is helpful—Noise-canceling Bluetooth over-ear headphones for really discerning ears that live up to the Technics name.

Technics cannot sense what you are doing and automatically adjust noise reduction levels. However, they have a pressure sensor that pauses music playback when the earbuds are removed and resumes after replacement. On the other hand, F70N also has three different modes, varying in system intensity. The noise-cancellation system is doing quite well in different situations, but there’s a side-effect in addition to high efficiency.

With the highest noise reduction level, the headphones generate an unpleasant noise in the background blurring the playback performance. It’s quite natural in noise-canceling headphones for this effect to occur. The positive aspect is that noises from the outside are diminished to a large extent. The differences in sound between on and off ANC proved to be easily noticeable this time. It manifests itself by emphasizing the response in the treble and bass. The sound becomes a bit less subtle and more overpowering.

5/5
5/5

The Technics is equipped with 40 mm drivers with strong neodymium magnets that deliver a clear and crisp sound. To be able to really use high-quality, high-resolution audio files on an audio player that supports LDAC (96 kHz / 990 kBit/s), Technics implements Sony’s proprietary audio coding technology LDAC into F70N to enjoy the excellent acoustics of high-res tracks wirelessly.

The sound of the EAH-F70N is impressive across the board. At the same time, powerful, sensitive, spatially dense, homogeneous, never disruptive, yet captivating. The acoustics are almost identical in all three ANC operating modes, similarly to when active noise cancelation is off.

Technics EAH-F70N does not allow itself to be influenced by the modern trend of incorporating as much bass to give its sound reproduction a superficial appeal. The EAH-F70N sounded amazingly neutral, almost perfect. The bass is tight, controllable, and articulate in the band’s lower-end; the mids are detailed, although recessed. Plays acoustic music in a focused and accurate manner and doesn’t struggle to keep its composure when the noise-canceling is at the highest level. The headphones might lose a little bit of clarity and sharpness in the highs, but overall the sound image remains surprisingly resolute. In terms of soundstage and instrument separation, the EAH-F70N is good here, too, with great width and depth.

Regarding sound reproduction, Technics delivered more than we expected and managed to raise to the level of premium active noise-canceling headphones on the market, and even exceeded some.

4.6/5
4.6/5

The Technics EAH-F70N convinces with a no-frills design and good workmanship. They are very comfortable to wear, and the headphones can also be adjusted very precisely to the head’s size. Modern yet retro – the Technics EA H-F70N connects two worlds. Visually and technically, you get state of the art. To match its sleek aesthetics, the F70N also features a minimal control system. The mechanical keys are appealing in terms of appearance but can be quite troublesome to find and use when wearing headphones.

The active noise canceling works very effectively. The three different levels can be accessed via the tiny control keys on the earcup. Unfortunately, the headphones cannot be controlled via an app. The small, hard-to-locate button for changing the operating modes for active noise suppression is not the biggest shortcoming, though. The noise reduction is also not perfect. In “Low” mode, when the noise suppression is active, there is no noise generated at all, even only to a minor extent in “Medium” mode. However, in “High” mode, the noise-reduction headphones’ noise becomes apparent and even annoying when the volume is too low.

Pros

Cons

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